Northern Star Resources seals ‘screaming’ $US25m deal for Plutonic Gold Mine

Monday, 15. April 2019

Northern Star’s annual gold production looks set to nearly double. Photo: Phil CarrickShareholders in goldminer Northern Star will be hoping that lightning strikes twice, after managing director Bill Beament revealed what he believes is a ”screaming” deal with the world’s biggest goldminer.
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In a transaction that bears striking similarities to Northern Star’s wildly successful purchase of the Paulsens mine in 2010, the company has paid $US25 million to Barrick Gold for the Plutonic mine in Western Australia.

Plutonic remained profitable throughout 2013 despite the slump in the gold price, and is known to several members of the Northern Star team, including Mr Beament, who spent more than eight years working there. The acquisition is expected to almost double Northern Star’s annual gold production to 200,000 ounces, and the $US25 million price tag includes all the fleet and equipment to run the mine.

”We’ve doubled our production for less than 10 per cent of our market cap, it’s a screaming buy,” Mr Beament said on Monday.

After trading around 67¢ over recent days, Northern Star shares rose about 8 per cent on Monday, following the deal, to 72.7¢.

Plutonic has two years of gold reserves still in the ground and Northern Star is confident that can be taken out to seven years.

Mr Beament said he was confident of reducing Plutonic’s all-in cost of mining below the current $US1110 an ounce. The benchmark was $US1202 an ounce on Monday.

The purchase comes five months after Northern Star delayed development of its Ashburton mine until gold prices recover. Ashburton was supposed to turn Northern Star into a 200,000-ounce-a-year miner, but with gold prices showing no signs of recovery, the company has sought to achieve the same goal via Plutonic.

Northern Star shares have halved in the past year in a slide exacerbated by weakening gold prices. But at Monday’s price of 72.7¢, the stock is still well above the 3¢ it was fetching before the Paulsens purchase.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Harris has England on the run

Monday, 15. April 2019

Ryan Harris, not Mitchell Johnson, is the real reason that Australia go into the Boxing Day Test 3-0 up. He has shut down England’s top order, hustling batsmen into jerky responses with his sharp pace, offering them no easy escapes with his persistent accuracy.
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When he knocked over Alastair Cook, first ball in the second innings at Perth, with a peach that pitched leg and grazed the top of off, he had taken Cook’s wicket as often as any other bowler.

Harris hobbled out of Australia’s last Ashes series at home in plaster. He had produced devastating bowling in Perth to level the 2010-11 series at 1-1, and, after a late start to his Test career, looked as if he was starting to fulfil his potential. Then, in Melbourne, he suffered a stress fracture to his left ankle, limped out a match that England won easily to retain the Ashes, and headed home to Adelaide on crutches.

After a sequence of further injuries he arrived in England in the summer with his place in the side still uncertain and was not selected for the first Test that, of course, Australia lost by 14 runs. He took five for 72 in the first innings of the second Test at Lord’s and was a constant threat thereafter, finishing the series with 24 wickets at under 20.

He identified weaknesses in England’s top batsmen – the fuller ball just outside off stump to Cook, the surprise bouncer to Jonathan Trott, the nip-backer to Ian Bell – and was good enough to exploit them. He was always going to be an essential part of Australia’s attack in the present series if he could stay fit.

He began England’s slump at the Gabba with the wicket of Cook, caught behind pushing tentatively at Harris’s fuller slider.

Harris could have been playing for England in this series. Though born in Sydney he has a British passport because his father was born in Leicester and, while playing for Sussex in 2008, had considered committing himself to his dad’s country of birth. He had a meeting with Mike Gatting to discuss it, but after a lucrative offer from Queensland, pledged himself to Australia.

A late starter bowling-wise, only making his Test debut at the age of 30, he has, in a staccato career constantly interrupted by injury, developed an enviable reputation as a dismisser of top batsmen, and at paltry cost. He has the lowest Test-bowling average (22.45) of any present bowler apart from South Africa’s Vernon Philander.

Quicker than he looks, he is shorter than many international fast bowlers (5ft 10in) but makes light of his lack of height with great control of length. He tends to bowl fuller than many modern bowlers and his deliveries skate off the surface and soar into the keeper’s gloves rather than losing velocity by being banged in short of a length.

This, as much as anything, is the secret of his success. Most modern batsmen are crease-bound and conditioned to play ’back-of-a-length’ bowling with only nominal movement of their feet. Those bowlers who have the control and aspiration to bowl fuller – Harris, Philander, Jimmy Anderson – mine a rich seam of potential victims.

With his colossal shoulder strength Harris is quicker than the other two (averaging around 88mph) but moves the ball less.

He is the closest thing to the New Zealand great Richard Hadlee in the modern game. Hadlee once said he regarded an over as like having six bullets in a gun. He would try to use each bullet to get a batsman into a vulnerable position before killing him off. Harris’s dismissal of Bell in the Perth Test was a perfect illustration of this art.

A succession of outswingers to get Bell moving across his crease, the odd straight bouncer to keep him uncertain, then the alternative delivery angled in which had Bell pinned lbw.

Few fast bowlers get ’bowleds’ or lbws at the WACA because of the extra bounce. Being shorter and fuller, Harris is the exception.

He is 34, relatively old for a fast bowler, but has played just 19 Tests. This means he is hungry for success, and because of his long first-class experience, knows his own game well. He manages to combine an honest and highly personable disposition off the field with a total hatred of batsmen on it.It is a potent combination.

Now that Johnson has re-emerged as Australia’s scythe, hacking chunks out of batting orders, Harris can operate as an electric carver to dice up the prime cuts. England can only hope he develops another fault, and soon.

The Daily Telegraph

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Britain’s Only Reindeer Herd Prepare For Christmas

Monday, 15. April 2019

You won’t see Rudolph among this bunch, but this herd of about 130 reindeer are still popular this festive season.
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Reindeer were introduced to Scotland in 1952 by Swedish Sami reindeer herder, Mikel Utsi. Starting with just a few reindeer, the herd has now grown in numbers over the years and is currently at about 130 by controlling the breeding. The herd rages on 2,500 hectares of hill ground between 450 and 1,309 meters and stay above the tree line all year round regardless of the weather conditions.

Reindeer of the Cairngorm Herd on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Reindeer of the Cairngorm Herd on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Reindeer of the Cairngorm Herd on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Reindeer of the Cairngorm Herd on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Eve Grayson, a Reindeer herder at the Cairngorm Herd, feeds the deer on December 23, 2013 in Aviemore, Scotland. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Former news.com.au editor Luke McIlveen taken to court over Mail Online defection

Monday, 15. April 2019

Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp has taken urgent legal action against a former editor who defected to the rival new Mail Online website.
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Luke McIlveen left his post as the editor of news南京夜网.au at the start of the month to take up the role of founding editor of dailymail南京夜网.au, a local version of the popular London-based tabloid.

The local website is a joint venture between the Daily Mail Group and Nine Entertainment Co’s digital arm Mi9. It is expected to launch early next year.

Mr McIlveen is a former chief of staff of the Daily Telegraph and editor of News’ daily suburban newspaper the Manly Daily. He was asked to leave News’s Holt St headquarters once his defection was announced.

On Tuesday the NSW Supreme Court heard the legal dispute is about whether there was an “oral agreement” given to Mr McIlveen which had the effect of releasing him from certain terms of his contact with News.

Lawyers for Mr McIlveen told Justice James Stevenson that a witness they may wish to call is in London and would need to give evidence via audio-visual link.

Both sides agreed to interim consent orders, including that McIlveen is restrained from starting work with the Daily Mail until January 3.

The matter will return to court on Monday for a full-day hearing

Employees who take a position with a direct competitor are often forced to go on “gardening leave”, where they are instructed to stay home and not perform their usual duties.

Employers sometimes use gardening leave to prevent an employee from having access to the business’ confidential information during the notice period.

A spokesman for News Corp Australia declined to comment.

Mr McIlveen did not return calls.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

$43m drug haul at Ourimbah: photos, video

Monday, 15. April 2019

Officers allegedly seized litres of solvents used to cook the drugs. Photo: NSW Police The house where the alleged drug laboratory was found. Photo: NSW Police
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There was a swimming pool at the home where the drugs were allegedly seized. Photo: NSW Police

A Central Coast drug syndicate allegedly manufacturing more than $43 million worth of drugs to distribute across the state has been smashed following a year-long investigation, police say.

Six men were arrested in co-ordinated raids on Monday that netted millions of dollars worth of ice as well as a treasure trove of goods including guns, cash, jewellery, luxury vehicles, steroids, a South American Macaw and a Diamond python.

A clandestine laboratory hidden on a multimillion-dollar semi-rural property just metres from the M1 motorway at Ourimbah was the headquarters of the operation, police allege.

RAW VISION: Police uncover a laboratory in the NSW Central Coast containing methylamphetamine with an estimated street value in excess of $43 million.Vision: NSW Police.

From its driveway down a narrow bush track, the one-storey home appeared to be a plush bush retreat with four cars in its garages, a golf buggy, a pool and a personal gym.

However, officers allegedly found a sophisticated drug lab set up in a garage attached to the home with four kilograms of methylamphetamine or ‘ice’, 1200 litres of solvents used to cook the drugs and 37 litres of methylamphetamine oil, which makes about 37 kilograms of ice.

The drugs were allegedly distributed throughout the Central Coast, Sydney and interstate.

“It’s a significant arrest by anyone’s standards purely based on the volume of meth seized at the lab,” said Drugs Squad Commander Nick Bingham.

“The potential for that lab, based on the output it has on a daily basis, is huge and we’re hoping it will have a noticeable impact on ice on the central coast in particular.

“The money the distributors are making from it is one thing, but the social issues ice creates and the havoc that it wreaks on families and hospital emergency wards and so many others is another.”

Two men, both aged 32, arrested at a home in Matcham, were allegedly in charge of the manufacturing of the drugs.

Police seized a Glock pistol, a Luger pistol, cash, steroids and three vehicles – a Mercedes C63, a Mercedes CLK and a Jeep – from the home.

Three men who were allegedly involved in the distribution of the drug were arrested at homes in Ourimbah, Palmdale and Matcham.

The sixth man, a 37 year-old well-known criminal in the area, was located during the same operation but was wanted by Operation Polaris investigators in relation to organised crime on Australia’s waterfront.

The operation began last November following information from the NSW Crime Commission that suggested one of the men was involved in large scale drug supply. He was monitored for 12 months, leading police to many of his associates.

Detective Superintendent Bingham said the arrests capped off a big year in the fight against drug crime.

“The number of clan labs shut down by police in NSW during 2013 now totals 113,” he said. “Furthermore, we have seized millions of dollars worth of illegal drugs and charged hundreds of people with significant drug supply offences.”

He urged people to look out for the seven tell-tale signs of a suburban drug lab:

– Strange odours emanating from the property

– Diverted electricity

– Chemical containers and waste

– Blacked out windows

– Hoses and pipes in strange places

– Blinds down, with extremely bright indoor lighting radiating through gaps

– Vehicles arriving at odd hours

EARLIER:

INVESTIGATORS from the State Crime Command’s Drug Squad have arrested six men, and seized more than $43 million worth of drugs – as well as firearms, cash, and exotic animals – as part of an operation targeting a major drug supply syndicate headquartered on the Central Coast.

Earlier this year, detectives from the Drug Squad, Operation Polaris and the NSW Crime Commission formed Strike Force Gingera and Operation Galantin to investigate the commercial manufacture and distribution of illicit drugs by a syndicate based on the Central Coast.

On Monday, police executed multiple search warrants at properties across the Central Coast, resulting in the arrests of six men.

At 9.20am, officers executed a search warrant at a rural property in Ourimbah. During the search of the property, police located an active clandestine laboratory, containing methylamphetamine with an estimated street value in excess of $43 million. Inside the property’s main residence, officers also located and seized MDMA, cash and two exotic animals – a South American Macaw and a Diamond Python.

The animals were taken from the property by the Wildlife Information Rescue and Education Service (WIRES), while a 38-year-old man residing at the property was arrested and taken to Wyong Police Station where he was charged in relation to the manufacture and supply of prohibited drugs, and money laundering. He was bail refused to appear at Wyong Local Court on Tuesday.

Shortly after 10.30am, detectives, assisted by specialist police from the Tactical Operations Unit, executed a search warrant at a property in Matcham. During a search of the home, officers located and seized a Glock pistol, a Luger pistol, cash, steroids and three vehicles – a Mercedes C63, a Mercedes CLK and a Jeep. Two men – both aged 32 – were arrested at the scene.

One of the men was charged with offences relating to the large commercial manufacture and supply of prohibited drugs, and for participating in a criminal group. The other man was charged in relation to the manufacture and supply of prohibited drugs, possession of prohibited firearms, and for participating in a criminal group. Both men were refused bail to appear in Gosford Local Court on Tuesday.

Around 10.30am, detectives, with the assistance of police from Strike Force Raptor, executed a search warrant at a property in Holgate, seizing four vehicles – two Audis and two Mercedes’ – more than $500,000 in jewellery, steroids, electronic devices, financial documentation and more than 20 litres of chemical substances. A 37-year-old resident of the home was arrested and charged with fraud and proceeds of crime offences. He has been granted conditional bail to appear in Gosford Local Court on 4 February 2014.

At 10.30am, police executed a search warrant at a property in Palmdale, seizing a Cobra Shelby vintage sports car, two air rifles, two stun-guns, cannabis and cash.

About 11am, officers arrested a 27-year-old man in Matcham. He was charged with participating in a criminal group and granted conditional bail to appear in Gosford Local Court on 4 February 2014.

Shortly after 12.30pm, police executed as search warrant at a home in Erina. During the search, investigators located cash, prohibited drugs and prescription medicine. A 30-year-old resident of the property was arrested and charged with commercial drug supply and participation in a criminal group. He was refused bail to appear in Gosford Local Court on Tuesday.

The Commander of the Drug Squad, Detective Superintendent Nick Bingham, said yesterday’s arrests capped off a big year in the fight against drug crime.

“The number of clan labs shut down by police in NSW during 2013 now totals 113,” Detective Superintendent Bingham said.

“Furthermore, we have seized millions of dollars worth of illegal drugs and charged hundreds of people with significant drug supply offences.”

Detective Superintendent Bingham said officers across the police force were committed to the fight against drug crime, and reminded members of the public that they have a role to play too.

“Illicit drugs have been outlawed for a reason – they are dangerous,” Detective Superintendent Bingham said.

“They can destroy the lives of those who take them as well as the lives of users’ families and friends.

“In particular, methylamphetamine been known to ravage people’s lives. Many long-term users lose lots of weight, develop skin and internal infections, and succumb to irrational, aggressive and even psychotic behavior.

Signs of a drug house: police poster

“We will continue to do everything we can to gets drugs – and the people who deal them – off our streets, but we need the public’s help to succeed.

“Please familiarise yourself with the seven telltale signs of a drug house and, if you spot something suspicious in your neighbourhood, call us.”